Fish Tank #34 Close But No Cigar: Millencolin

Fish Tank #34

Close But No Cigar:

Millencolin

Starting in 1992 out of Orebro, Sweden was the flag ship band for Burning Heart records and one of the first skate punk bands I went crazy over, Millencolin. Their name is taken from a skate trick named Melancholy. These guys are an amazing blend of some heart wrenching lyrics and straight shredding. Well, for those of ya who don’t know these guys, let’s solve that problem.

1994 saw the debut album Tiny Tunes. This was initially released in Europe on Epitaph’s sub label Burning Heart. When it was released in the U.S. the band was forced to rename it Same Old Tunes and change the cover art due to a lawsuit from Warner Brothers. This album was primarily straight ahead skate punk with a few ska punk songs. Stand outs on this include Mr. Clean and Da Strike.

1995 dropped Life On A Plate. This continued their blend of skate and ska punk songs. Their playing continued to tighten up. Stand out tracks on this include Bullion and Vulcan Ears. This was another solid effort from Millencolin.

1997 gave us For Monkeys. This had a break out single for this band with Lozin’ Must. An honestly great song. Their sound was getting harder on some songs in this album. The other stand out on this was Twenty Two.

2000 was Millencolin’s break out release Pennybridge Pioneers. This was their jump from Burning Heart to Epitaph. They had dropped the ska sound and every track on this is solid punk rock. Stand outs on this are Fox, Penguins and Polar Bears and No Cigar. The album title is the English translation of the band’s home town. No Cigar was featured in Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 2.

2002 was Home From Home. The Millencolin sound plowed right along in this album. In some was the sound hardened up more on singles like Man or Mouse and Kemp. The true stand out on this album though was Punk Rock Rebel. This is a tribute song for that old dog that got ya into punk to begin with, we all have one.

2005 gave us Kingwood. There are number of notably harder tracks on this one. Some are at more of a break neck pace than anything this band had done prior. The stand out is a dark and sad song known as Shut You Out though. It’s not a slow song by any means though, it’s a punk rock ballad you can thrash a ramp to.

2008 was Millencolin’s most current release Machine 15. Through all the years and albums this band hasn’t slowed up one bit. Aside from these releases the singe Nikola has released 4 solo albums. The band continues to tour and are said to be working on a new album. They even had a Vans shoe which I’d like to see come back. So lube up your bearings and play some of the Pennybridge Pioneers at your next skate session.

-C Fish

Maty’s Corner #32 Keepin’ The Ape Drape Alive: The Vandals

Maty’s Corner #32

Keepin’ The Ape Drape Alive:

The Vandals

 

            Starting 1980 outta Huntington Beach, CA is The Vandals! One of the most recognizable bands in punk. They are survivors of the 1980’s hard core scene who managed to stay punk and not just give up, even after the exit of founding vocalist Stevo Jensen. Along with being a legendary band, they also appeared in the punk rock favorite cult film suburbia and were a staple at the legendary Cuckoo’s Nest during its existence. All while poking fun at everything including punk itself.

            1982,84 and 89 mark the Vandals’ first release. This was initially two separate releases being Peace Through Vandalism and When In Rome, Do As The Vandals. The compilation was released on Mike Ness’ Restless Records. These releases saw The Vandals as a strange mix of hard core and cow punk. It was different from the rest of the musical landscape of the time. These were the only two releases with Stevo as he chose to leave the band. This release contains many of the Band’s best known songs.

            1989 saw Slippery When Ill which was straight up cow punk from this band. This was mostly as a joke on the resurgence in popularity of country music. A great, if not unconventional album. This was the start of Dave Quackenbush on vocals who was rather seemless as he sounded so much like Stevo.

            1990 saw the beginning of The Vandals being a beloved skate punk band with Fear of a Punk Planet. They were still weird as always. This album even includes an odd cover of Summer Lovin’. This was the start of a new era for the Vandals.

            1995 saw them sign to Nitro Records and release Live Fast, Diarrhea. This is a great album. It included the popular song And Now We Dance. The band gained notable popularity due to a song off this and a character wearing their shirts in an episode of X Files. This whole album is solid and has been a favorite of mine for years.

            1996 came out with what was my first and still favorite album The Quickening. This album largely pokes at Anarchism and Nihilism. It tears into a few other themes as well. This and the first release are always what I refer newcomers to as far as this band goes. Another great track is Aging Orange that tears into the music industry.

Settings

            Later in 1996 gave Oi to the World. The Vandals Christmas classic. It’s played in my home every year. Also gave the premise for the Vandals Winter Formal show that occurs in Anaheim every year. Aside from the title track my other stand out is Gun For Christmas. This album was released on Kung Fu Records where the band would later go on to stay.

            1998 gave the release of Hitler Bad, Vandals Good. Another solid one from this band. This has a number of great songs such as People That Are Going To Hell, My Girlfriend’s Dead and Ape Drape. This album had a lot more humor than the face kick of The Quickening.

            2000 gave us Look What I Almost Stepped in. It opens with another middle finger to the music industry. This album would see Brooks Wackerman leave to join Bad Religion (can’t blame him). From here The Vandals would leave Nitro for their own label of Kung Fu.

            2002 saw Internet Dating Super Studs come out. It features 43210-1 which is the theme of The Show Must Go Off series. This album largely poked the humor at internet culture. A stand out off this is Unseen Tears of the Albacore.

            2004 brought us The Vandals most recent release, Hollywood Potato Chip. The title is a reference to “love” stains left on a couch, you’re welcome for that. This album is a bit more aggressive than their last few. It’s like a lot off of The Quickening. So if ya didn’t know the Vandals, go forth and rock the fuck out now!

-Maty Almost

Maty’s Corner #31 I Wanna Be Unusual, I Wanna Be Punk Rock: Guttermouth

Maty’s Corner #31

I Wanna Be Unusual, I Wanna Be Punk Rock:

Guttermouth

Starting in 1988 from Huntington Beach, CA is a band with no middle ground on fan base, Guttermouth. One of the more influential skate punk bands, their lyrics definitely tapped into the attitude and these guys were exactly that. Led by the extremely sensitive Mark Adkins this band knows how to make ya feel special and loved. Actually, they don’t give a crap. Whether you think they’re awesome or they fucking piss you off, if you’ve heard them, you’ve strongly reacted. If you’re able to hang, enjoy the ride, if not, get off the ramp now!

1991 saw their first album titled Full Length. The cd version includes the Puke and Balls EPs. All of this was released on Dr. Strange Records. It would be reissued by Nitro in 1996. These first releases established the band’s presence as a hard driving fuck you of a skate punk band. Songs like 1,2,3, Slam and Bruce Lee Vs. The Kiss Army let us know that things aren’t that serious, so have a good time.

1994 dropped in with Friendly People. This really turned up the offense. Songs like P.C. set the tone for a band that that the “ethical” crowd wasn’t gonna dig on. 10 years after this album they would manage to get pushed out of a warped tour for upsetting a number of bands by not following the established punk rule of falling in line with the democrats. So much for punk being about having your own ideas and opinions.

1996 came out with Teri Yakimoto. They had started getting better musically. The tongue in cheek kept right on going. They had even been working with some harmonies. The Guttermouth sound was still true, just improved.

1997 saw what this band’s best album, Musical Monkey is probably. With songs like Lucky the Donkey, Lipstick, and Do the Hustle nothing was safe or sacred here. The entire album is hilarious and just rages through 28 minutes of punk fucking rock. It’s definitely my favorite. Do the Hustle is also known as Skater’s Anthem. If you don’t know why, find and listen to that song now, then come back to reading.

1999 brought Gorgeous. This would be their last release on Nitro. This had a more aggressive sound than their previous releases. It continues to be as good as their other albums. A highlight track on this is Viva America, reminding us that things could be worse elsewhere in their unique way.

2001 saw their first release on Epitaph. This saw Guttermouth move back to the sound of previous albums. There are several great songs on this, such as Can I Borrow Some Ambition and Secure Horizons. The latter track sounds halfway like financial advice from Mr. Adkins. Also an intimate look at relationships with She’s Got the Look.

2002 gave us Gusto! They got a bit more experimental with the sound here. It’s still good. The opening song is a stand out. The usual insult of the whinier contingent of the punk scene. Scholarship in punk and Contribution are also great tracks. Critics and fans bitched about the album being so different. Well, fuck the critics, and if you love a band, you’ll learn to adjust.

2004 saw Guttermouth sign to Volcom Entertainment and release Eat Your Face. The cover looks like a joke on the over angry crust punk bands who feel a need to put some fucked up looking starving child on every bands’ fucking album. Note: calm the fuck down Profane Existence, your making punk a dousche instead of a threat. Moving along, this is a great album seeing this crew go back to the sound we know and love so those who can’t adapt could stop freaking out. Great track here is Surf’s Up Asshole.

2006 saw what is their most recent release, Shave the Planet. Best track on this is My Chemical Imbalance. This is as good as their whole catalogue. They are currently active on Hopless records touring. Hopefully they’ll put an album out sooner or later. No go put on some Guttermouth and fucking shred!

 

-Maty Almost

Maty’s Corner #21 Milo Finished College and Got Saved by Allroy: A Story of Descendents and All

Maty’s Corner #21

Milo Finished College and Got Saved by Allroy:
A Story of Descendents and All

1978 Hermosa Beach California, something is stirring that would effect the whole of Southern California punk rock and be a pillar of an early label. Fishing would be the initial spark behind the 2 most seminal bands in pop punk and 1 of the most in punk as a whole. Bill Stevenson (Drummer and overall mastermind behind both bands) worked at a bait and tackle shop under Keith Morris’ dad. Bill asked Keith about music, from there he got turned on to Ramones, Sex Pistols, Dickies and most importantly The Last. Bill and Joe Nolte of The Last became fast friends. They then met Frank Navetta, who came up with the name and wrote many of Descendents’ best known songs. Joe left to commit to his initial band and Tony Lombardo was randomly found near 9th and Walnut in Long Beach. 1980 would see Milo recruited and this was the real start of Descendents rockin and rollin every night.

1982 brought us Descendents best known and one of the South Bay’s most important albums, Milo Goes to College. This was the beginning on the South Bay powerhouse of SST Records. This whole album is utterly stand out. From Navetta’s I’m not a Loser and Parents, Milo’s Hope, Lombardo’s Suburban Home to Stevenson’s Bikeage. This band is far from a one man show. This is in the list of most solid albums from California punk rock, nothing bad and everything good.

1985 dropped off I Don’t Wanna Grow Up. This is opens up with the Descendents self titled theme song. This was born out of the few years Stevenson spent in Black Flag while Milo was learning to save the world with science. Bill had a batch of songs he wrote the wouldn’t work with the Flag. This also gave us Silly Girl and Good Good Things. It’s good that they weren’t trying to re-do the Milo album.

1986 dropped out Enjoy. A different album from the previous 2. There’s some darker heavier tracks, but still Descendents nonetheless. There’s a few of the excellent punk love songs on this like Get The Time, a cover of Beach Boys’ Wendy and Sour Grapes. From here a new idea would be born.

ALL was birthed in 1987. This album introduced the philosophy of ALL! It’s punctuated with some great standard Descendents songs as well. Including one of the groups most heavy heart songs Clean Sheets. For those who don’t the All-O-Gistics they are:thou shalt not commit laundry
thou shalt covet thy neighbor’s food (all)
thou shalt not create ties with the scathed (no all)
thou shalt always go for greatness
thou shalt not commit adulthood (all)
thou shalt not partake of decaf (all!)
thou shalt not suppress flatulence
thou shalt not commit hygiene (all!)
thou shalt not have no idea (all)
thou shalt commit thyself to an institution (no all)
thou shalt not take the van’s name in vain
thou shalt not allow anything to deter you in your quest for all (all!) you may achieve all
and not wallow unknown for eternity,
all you have to do is do it! all!(we shall achieve all) he who bears the most gas, let him also bear forth his ass, and cast forth the first frap
(all!)

Nine years later in 1996 the Descendents came back on a new label, Epitaph Records. They gave us Everything Sucks. This spawned 2 video singles for When I Get Old and I’m The One. The influence of ALL showed in the songwriting, this is their best album since Milo went to college. Another stand out on this is Coffee Mug, the tribute to the container for the elixir of God.

There would be another 8 year hiatus until 2004’s Cool To Be You. This came out on Fat Wreck. It’s a great enough album to be worth the wait. The Descendents/ ALL sound were fully merged into one unit as of this release. This is their most current. Descendents are still active with live shows.

During the Descendents’ breaks Stevenson and the other members minus Milo have been nurturing ALL starting in 1987. This is on of the most underrated bands as they’ve always had the stigma of the singer not being Milo. They’ve had a revolving door of some great vocalists including Dag Nasty/ Down By Law front man Dave Smalley. They even had an album on Interscope Records. It’s a different sound from Descendents and very worth the time to check out. For more to feed your Milo and Allroy addiction get the documentary Filmage. Now get to know these bands’ music, drink of the bonus cup and go for ALL!

-Maty Almost

Links:

https://www.facebook.com/thedescendents

https://www.facebook.com/ALL

https://www.facebook.com/filmagemovie

Maty’s Corner #20 Fuck Armageddon… This is Bad Religion (Re Mastered)

Maty’s Corner Issue # 20
Fuck Armageddon… This is Bad Religion (Re Mastered)

In the initial writing of this article it was kind of weak and I realized it could be much better. Without sacrificing the original content, here’s the re master of an article many of you enjoyed.
Bad Religion, the band that really got me into punk rock when I first bought 1998’s No Substance by pure happen stance. Bad Religion is into their 34th year of punk rockin’ it. They started up in 1979 in Los Angeles, CA. First show was November 11th 1980 in Burbank, CA. Back when the now widely known Epitaph Records was nothing more than a name and P.O. Box that Mr. Brett put on the album sleeves to say “yeah, we have a label.” Their music has been instrumental in shaping the sound of both the original hard core scene and the later melodic hard core genre. Greg Graffin himself who holds numerous advanced degrees in a variety of subjects and currently boasts 3 books covering religion, Anarchism, evolution and Naturalism has caused many a punk rocker to get educated whether by institution or self. It has definitely been instrumental in my own studies of varying subjects. They currently stand at 16 full length studio albums making them one of, if not the most prolific punk band along with 35 for years without any hiatus periods.


Bad Religion first graced us with a recording in 1981. This was their self titled EP. At only 6 songs it kicked in the door on what we knew of punk and hard core. This release set the precedent with punk that was both aggressive and the smartest thing we’d heard since The Clash. The playing was as fast as it was tight. It didn’t sound like teenagers with no real record label as of yet.


The following year, 1982, would bring us How Could Hell Be Any Worse? They were even more solid with an improved recording quality. At this point Graffin still had a raspy growl to his voice and they’d not started playing with harmonies yet. This record has been catching fire in the scene on a continuous basis since its initial release. It’s still as good 32 years later.

1983 was a… interesting year for the band. They released Into theUnknown. This was an apt title as it’s a weird keyboard driven album. Nothing like any of the band’s other releases. Still a great album, just unusual. It has become easier to find as time has gone on.


1985 gave us back the Bad Religion we all know. The well titled Back to the Known EP. This was the band back to hard core punk. Greg’s voice had changed for the better and it was the beginning of the “oozinahhs” that we’ve come to know them for. It was awesome to have this treasure of the scene back in the form we know and love.


1988 brought their next studio album. At a time when the punk scene had gone to sleep, this was a needed slap in the face to re ignite things. This was the real beginning of Bad Religion as we know them now. This was a 26 minute blast in the face of hair metal. Possibly the most necessary punk albums of the 80s. They had become a bit more melodic with multi part harmonies that only added more teeth to their sound.


1989 saw the release of No Control. This was faster and harder than Suffer without sacrificing the newfound harmonic ideas that had cultivated in Suffer. This contains a standout for me, the first Bad Religion song I’d ever heard, I Want to Conquer the World. I was 16 and this single song changed my life. This began my love affair with punk rock music and my quest to better understand a world I’d been developing opinions about.

Following this was 1990’s Against the Grain. This was more complex than any previous album. ATG was the first feature of the anthem like 21st Century Digital Boy. About half this album would fall onto a “greatest hits” comp.


1992 gave us Generator. BR was pushing their musical and lyrical complexity even further while staying the unrelenting punk maelstrom we’d com to know. Generator gave us BR’s first ever video single for the amazing track, Atomic Garden. The ideas expressed on the album would be the beginning of what we hear from them for the next 22 years.


1993 brought in Recipe For Hate which opened with one of the most aggressive title tracks in punk rock. Recipe also contained 2 video singles for American Jesus and Struck a Nerve. The blend of sonic and complex was becoming more apparent by now. The signature harmonies were fully solidified by this release. Recipe would be BR’s final pairing with Epitaph for nearly a decade.


1994 spat out a new album on a new label. Stranger Than Fiction appeared on Atlantic Records. It doesn’t sound at all like the major label boogey man had stolen any fight out of this unit. This put out 4 singles and videos, better unleashing Bad Religion on an unsuspecting world. There were some great collaborations with Wayne Kramer, Tim Armstrong and Jim Lindbergh. A lot of fans bitched about this album sucking; I think they just weren’t smart enough to get it.


1996 brought about The Gray Race, a more aggressive album than Stranger. Mr. Brett had left the band to solely concentrate on Epitaph. Filling his spot was Minor Threat’s Brian Baker. Much like the entirety of their Atlantic years, this was met with a lot of negativity that I don’t understand. Guess that’s what happens when people listen to the punk police instead of deciding for themselves. Fuck the rules and just be punk! This continued the formula of being pure amazing expressed through music.


1998 saw No Substance, the first BR album I bought. This is a front to back solid album. Still my favorite from the Atlantic years. It features a weird spoken word track, State of the Union at the End of the Millennium. It still rings as relevant today as it did in ’98. This was their least successful album, yet again, people just didn’t get it.


May 9th 2000 at punk fifteen in the morning Bad Religion’s final album on Atlantic was released. The New America was Bad Religion’s most personal album, some politics, but more sonic introspection. Mr. Brett was even coming back in as he co wrote a track. From here the crew would head back home to Epitaph.


2002 brought us BR’s most anticipated album in years. Mr. Brett was back and the band now had 3 guitarists. The Process of Belief is as amazing of an album as was expected. The Greg and Brett formula picked up as though it had never left off.


2004 Bad Religion released an album that pushed the boundaries and complexity even further. Empire Strikes First was a politically charged blast that showed even an overture can be punk rock. The 3 guitar attack had fully come into its own creating a wall of sound not previously heard in the genre. The hills of Los Angeles are still burning.


It would be a 3 year wait until New Maps of Hell arrived in 2007. This album was solid enough to be worth it. The band had made it to the 27 club. It features the most intricate guitar work of the band’s career and pulls it off without sounding the least bit bland.


In 2010 their 30th anniversary brought an album reminiscent of their older material, The Dissent of Man. It rocks similar to Generator. It was a breath of fresh air to see this punk monolith getting back to basics.


2013, exactly 11 years after Process of Belief Bad Religion released their most back to basics album, True North. It flows like No Control. This is the blast from the past it’s been hailed as. Sadly, Greg Hetson has had to leave the band following this due to personal problems. The Bad Religion story doesn’t end here as they’re working on a new album. 34 years isn’t enough!

As far as I’m concerned every album by these guys has been great. Even their “dark period” as Graffin calls it when Mr. Brett had temporarily left the band. My favorite album is still the All Ages compilation. 2nd album I got from them and it just blew my mind. Still hits me just right all these years later. This band has been attached to some of the best times in my life and been a soundtrack to getting through some of the worst. Other than the impact of the band themselves, Epitaph has been a force for putting punk on the map with a number of seminal releases in the 80’s and 90’s scenes. Also their sub labels of Hell Cat and Burning Heart have done the scene a lot of good. BR has been a driving force in my constant effort to keep up on the increasingly fucked world we inhabit. So, if you don’t know this band, research and hear now! If you’ve not listened in a while give ‘em another spin and see if the magic is still there.

-Maty Almost

Keep up

https://punxinsolidarity.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post-new.phpWith Bad Religion

http://www.badreligion.com/

https://www.facebook.com/badreligion

Learn Something

https://punxinsolidarity.wordpress.com/2013/10/23/fast-food-and-the-music-industry-by-greg-graffin-2/

https://punxinsolidarity.wordpress.com/2013/10/22/web-surdites-by-greg-graffin/

https://punxinsolidarity.wordpress.com/2013/10/22/a-punk-synopsis-by-greg-graffin/

https://punxinsolidarity.wordpress.com/2013/10/22/a-comment-on-responsible-voting-by-greg-graffin/

https://punxinsolidarity.wordpress.com/2013/10/22/punk-manifesto-by-greg-graffin/

Maty’s Corner #16 Pulley: The Esteem Driven Engine Still Matters

Maty’s Corner #16

Pulley: The Esteem Driven Engine Still Matters

Pulley started up in 1994, right in the beginning thick of the Southern California skate punk revolution of music that shaped my life. This 5 piece hard hitting melodic punk unit is led by Scott Radinsky who was no stranger the punk scene by 94 having been in Scared Straight during its 10 year existence (83-93) being heavy hitters in the Nardcore Mystic Records scene. They then went on to become skate punk greats Ten Foot Pole. Radinsky was in charge of that unit for their first 2 releases then forced to leave due to his pro baseball that he was already 3 years deep into. Being that baseball conflicts with the tour schedule of most punk rock I see it is making sense. That didn’t preclude Radinsky from being the voice of TFP’s seminal single My Wall.

Right outta the gate Pulley was a bit of a super group consisting of Radinsky from his aforementioned bands; Jim Cherry (may his soul be rested) of Strung Out; Matt Riddle of Face To Face and No Use For a Name; and Tony Palermo from Ten Foot Pole and Unwritten Law.

Pulley’s first drop in was 1995’s Esteem Driven Engine. A strong door kicker of a debut from these punk veterans. It slams open with Cashed In which would be a candidate on a best of record. Right away this first album sets a tone for more introspective lyrics which tends to happen to us punks as we get older. Take for instance Bad Religion’s material from the mid 90’s and forward.

Right after this was 97’s 60 Cycle hum. Again a really strong track starts the whole album off on the right foot, or left if ya skate goofy. The most interesting track on this was Noddin’ Off. It kicks like Ten Foot Pole or Scared Straight. I think kinda letting us all know that they remember who they are. Another overall solid effort from this board breaking unit.

1999 brought us @#!*, referred to as self titled. Honestly my favorite album by these guys. I believe it’s also their most popular. The lyrics start getting real introspective and the music on a couple tracks is even a bit dark. It’s still Pulley. The differences show growth in the band and they sound tighter than their first 2 albums. The stand out for me has always been Over It. Somewhat of a scathing indictment of the rat race that even the punk scene can degenerate into. Less of a middle finger and more a wake up call. The more incendiary and equally great track is Nothing To Lose. It’s been the background to a fuck you in my life numerous times. Just a great one to sing with and let something out.

2001 marked Pulley’s first album as a 4 piece, Together Again For The First Time. Jim Cherry had left the band to pursue Zero Down and dropped one solid album with them before he departed us. Despite the missing guitarist, this is as solid and tough an album as Pulley had put out. The first real stand out on this is “Hooray”hooray,matters,olympus,friends, for me. Another honest critique of the scene from the perspective of growing up but not giving in. The other one that hits me of this effort is “Same Sick Feeling.” Always sounds like one off of the 99 album and that’s not at all a bad thing.

2004 marked Pulley’s longest gap between albums. Matters shows the band hasn’t lost a bit of edge over their first 10 years. The band just sounds tighter with each offering they put out. It was also dedicated to their guitarist and friend Jim. This for me is like 99’s “self titled”. Most stand out on Matters is Insects Destroy. Has a bit of Bad Religion and Pennywise feel. Makes sense being that they were all label mates for so long. This marks Pulley’s final album on punk rock Olympus of Epitaph records and their last full length to date.

2009 after about 5 years Pulley gave us their first ep on a new label, Time Insensitive Material. Ghost Inside My Skin is the stand out of this short offering. It’s a blend of classic Pulley with some new ideas. The first glimpse of something new to come. 20011 gave us The Long And The Short Of It ep. Coming in at only 3 tracks, it leaves me hoping for a full length in the near future. There’s been rumors swirling around a new full length since 2012. I was fortunate to see them play recently. After 20 years of Pulley and 31 years of Scott Radinsky, neither part shows any sign of letting up for a long time to come.
Check out Pulley if you don’t know ‘em, re listen or catch ‘em live if ya do.

Article published in the popular Mega Zine STAMINA #3.
www.diy-publishing.com

You can keep up with Pulley over at:

Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/pulleymatters

EPITAPH
http://www.epitaph.com/artists/artist/59/Pulley

-Maty Almost

punxinsolidarity@gmail.com
https://punxinsolidarity.wordpress.com

Maty’s Corner # 3

 Maty’s Corner Issue # 3
Fuck Armageddon… This is Bad Religion

10126Bad Religion, the band that really got me into punk rock when I first bought 1998’s No Substance by pure happen stance.  Bad Religion is into their 34th year of punk rockin’ it.  They started up in 1979 in Los Angeles, CA.  First show was November 11th 1980 in Burbank, CA.  Back when the now widely known Epitaph Records was nothing more than a name and P.O. Box that Mr. Brett put on the album sleeves to say “yeah, we have a label.”

10124Their music has been instrumental in shaping the sound of both the original hard core scene and the later melodic hard core genre.  Greg Graffin himself who holds numerous advanced degrees in a variety of subjects and currently boasts 3 books covering religion, Anarchism, evolution and Naturalism has caused many a punk rocker to get educated whether by institution or self. It has definitely been instrumental in my own studies of varying subjects.

10122They currently stand at 16 full length studio albums making them one of, if not the most prolific punk band along with 34 for years without any hiatus periods.As far as I’m concerned every album by these guys has been great. Even their “dark period” as Graffin calls it when Mr. Brett had temporarily left the band.  My favorite album is still the All Ages compilation.  2nd album I got from them and it just blew my mind.  Still hits me just right all these years later.

10123This band has been attached to some of the best times in my life and been a soundtrack to getting through some of the worst.  Other than the impact of the band themselves, Epitaph has been a force for putting punk on the map with a number of seminal releases in the 80’s and 90’s scenes.  Also their sub labels of Hell Cat and Burning Heart have done the scene a lot of good.

10125BR has been a driving force in my constant effort to keep up on the increasingly fucked world we inhabit.  So, if you don’t know this band, research and hear now!  If you’ve not listened in a while give ‘em another spin and see if the magic is still there.

Maty Almost